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Those Are Not Apricots

Jeonju

Jeonju

I just read something that one of my friends back home posted on Facebook, and it reminded me of something I meant to tell you.  About a month ago, I was in the town of Jeonju, South Korea.  Jeonju is famous as the place bibimbap supposedly orginated.  It’s a fair size town, with a very big old quarter filled with “Hanok”–the traditional, old style Korean courtyard homes with the elevated, heated floors that you sleep on.  They call them “ondol” rooms.  Some of these old hanoks operate as bed and breakfasts.

Jeonju Bibimbap

Jeonju Bibimbap

People go there to stay in these old timey hanoks and browse through the very quaint old town.  Kind of like Korea’s version of Colonial Williamsburg, or Solvang.  You see a lot of out-of-towners there on weekend getaways; mostly Korean folks.  I didn’t see another westerner the whole time I was there, and there wasn’t a lot of English spoken or on signs.

Jeonju

Jeonju

Anyhoo, I wanted to have the experience of staying in a hanok, and sleep on the floor and the whole shebang, so I was researching online to find a good one.  I often check out TripAdvisor when I’m looking for recommendations for places to stay; I find, if you read about five or six reviews, you usually get a pretty good sense of whether a place is going to work for you.

Bibimbap House.  Note the pottery vats in the garden; those are for "jang"--fermented foods, like gochujang and soy sauce.

Bibimbap House. Note the pottery vats in the garden; those are for “jang”–fermented foods, like gochujang and soy sauce.

So, I perused the reviews of various hanok in Jeonju, and I noticed that many of them referred to all the lovely apricot trees in town.  Several different people gushed about it; some even referring to a specific hanok in which they had stayed having a “big apricot tree” right there in the courtyard.  I thought “okay, have to make a note to see what kind of apricot stuff they have there that I can try,” assuming the locals would have all manner of jams and pastries and candies, etc., if they had so many apricots around.

Persimmon Tree

Persimmon Tree

When I got there, I kept my eyes peeled for these supposedly ubiquitous apricot trees, but there aren’t any.  There are, however, scads of persimmon trees.  Everywhere, branches loaded and heavy with the voluptuous, orange fruit.  In October, persimmons were starting to drop on the ground and sidewalks all over, like sweet, pulpy, orange bombs.

Another Persimmon Tree

Another Persimmon Tree

There’s nothing mutually exclusive about persimmons and apricots–we had both types of trees in our field when I was a kid–so it didn’t hit me until I had explored the whole area for a couple of days without seeing a single apricot tree, that I realized those TripAdvisor reviewers didn’t know a persimmon when they saw one!  Oh, no no no no no….those are not apricots.  Not even close.  The only similarity is that they both grow on trees, and they’re both some shade of orange, although not the same shade, at all.

Persimmons are very popular in Korea.  They eat them fresh, like any fruit.  I’m not crazy about the texture, but there’s no denying the sweet flavor.  It’s like candy.  Also, when the fruit is at its peak of ripeness, they freeze them, and then cut up the frozen persimmon flesh into cubes, and eat it like ice cream.  You don’t have to add a thing (although, I personally feel that most things benefit from a dab of cream, and I bet this would, too).  The freezing does away with the weird texture, and makes for a unique, delicious and healthy dessert!


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Some Stuff–Korea Edition

krlargeWrapping up almost two months in the “Land of the Morning Calm,” I thought I would start a tradition of saying goodbye to the lands I visit on my wanderings by jotting down some stuff that I saw/did/ate/learned during my time there that I will always remember.  So, in this, my 50th post on this site, I bid adieu to South Korea with the inaugural edition of “Some Stuff.”

Some Interesting Beauty Stuff

oliveThere have to be more beauty product stores in Korea than there are people.  Olive Young, Nature Republic, Skin Food, Etude House…I could go on for pages, there are so many.  They are often right next to each other, too, sandwiched between the endless sock and cell phone cover vendors.  I love potions and lotions and beauty gadgets almost as much as corndogs, and finding exotic ones always makes me smile, so I spent more than my fair share of time perusing these shops’ wares.  Let me just say, they put some fun stuff on their faces in Korea.

I saw a lot of these eyelid tapes and glues in various shops.  I was wondering whose eyelids were flapping around in the wind so badly that they would need to be glued or taped down.  But, it’s actually used to create an extra fold in the eyelid when the eye is open, to change the shape of the eye.  This made me a little sad.

Next time I go to Korea, I’m taking a suitcase full of Herbal Essences and Burt’s Bees products to sell on the street to finance my trip.  A regular sized bottle of that bargain basement shampoo that costs just a few bucks in the States will run you 13,900 Won, or about $14 USD, in Korea; a tiny tin of Burt’s Bees lip balm or cuticle cream is even worse:  about 20,000 Won, or roughly $20 USD.  I wonder if they know Burt’s Bees is owned by Clorox?

flush buttonThis doesn’t really fit into the “beauty products” category, but it is under the umbrella of feminine modesty and demureness, so I’ll just stick it here.  In some public restrooms, they have these little boxes on the wall with a speaker and a recording of a toilet flushing, that you can play while you tinkle so you can delude yourself that no one can hear what you’re doing.  Staves off the bashful bladder syndrome, I guess.  Saves water, too, by keeping women from constantly flushing the toilet while they’re trying to go.  This is not just in fancy public powder rooms, either.  I took this photo in the KTX train station in Seoul.  They also have panic buttons in there that you can press to summon help if you’re in trouble, like, if you’ve run in there to hide from someone trying to attack you.  Pretty nifty.

Some Stuff I Ate and Will Now Forever Crave

Galbi grill and a kajillion banchan.

Galbi grill and a kajillion banchan.

Oh, gentle friends, I could devote several pages to waxing poetic about Korea’s food.  I now have a number of new temptations to resist.  The barbecue, obviously, is out of this world.  Whether galbi (short rib), or samgyeopsal (pork belly), or what-have-you, the tabletop grill and scores of “banchan” (side dishes) make for a blow-your-mind meal.

Pork of "8 Kind Tastes"

Pork of “8 Kind Tastes”

I was just lucky to have friends to go with, as the tables are those giant, communal deals, and you never see anyone sitting there solo.

Tteokbokki

Tteokbokki

My friend Jung Eun told me on my first day in Seoul that, unless you have eaten Tteokbokki (also known as topokki), you can’t say you’ve been to Korea.  So, she took me to her favorite shop and we ate a pile of it.  I was skeptical at first.  The dish is described as “rice cakes and fish cakes in spicy sauce,” and that just didn’t ring any bells for me.  But, I’m a good sport, so I tucked in…and I loved it.  It’s sort of like chewy pasta in red enchilada sauce.  You see it a lot at street stands.  It’s cheap, delicious snack food.

Half jjajangmyun, half spicy seafood soup

Half jjajangmyun, half spicy seafood soup

There was a Korean soap opera I watched that was basically a Korean re-write of the movie “Overboard” with Kurt Russell and Goldie Hawn.  But, since it was 16 one-hour episodes, obviously they had to expand the story.  Anyway, one of the little bits of the Korean version of the story that was cute was how the rich, amnesiac lady–who had been such a snob before hitting her head and forgetting who she was–wouldn’t eat anything except this cheap noodle dish called “jjajangmyun,” or noodles with “brown sauce.”  Well, apparently, jjajangmyun is to Koreans what mac n’ cheese is to Americans.  And it rocks, hard.  Comfort food in the extreme.  Salty, slightly sweet, savory…so perfect on a rainy afternoon.  It is also one of the few things I could order coherently when I was alone in a restaurant, so I ate a lot of it.  mcdonaldsAt Jung Eun’s house, we had it delivered in these little divided bowls–half jjajangmyun and half spicy seafood soup, the perfect combination–and after we were done, the delivery guy came back and took the dirty dishes away!  I love that.  (You can get anything delivered in Korea; even KFC and McDonald’s deliver.  Not that it did me any good; I couldn’t order anything over the phone because I don’t speak Korean.)

I don't know what these little pancakey things are called, so I'll just call them Heaven Puffs.

I don’t know what these little pancakey things are called, so I’ll just call them Heaven Puffs.

In every market, some vendor will have a stand selling these nutty little pancake thingies, serving them folded in half in a paper cup.  Just to look at them, they reminded me a bit of the round puffs in face powder compacts.  They’re about the size of the palm of your hand (well, my hand), they have a chewy texture, and are filled with brown sugar, sesame powder, peanuts, and any number of yummy spices that melt into the dough as it fries on the grill.  Er-mah-gerd, people, these things are addictive.

Patbingsu

Patbingsu at Eskimo Hawaii

And then there’s Bingsu.  If “shaved ice with toppings” gives you visions of snow cones drizzled with syrups of colors that do not occur in nature, think again.  Bingsu is a whole different ball of wax…or, rather, bowl of ice.  Lots of places serve green tea flavored bingsu in a big, quart-sized Pyrex mixing cup, loaded with fresh fruits, mochi nuggets, and of course, the ever-present red beans (which makes it “Patbingsu”).  eskimoThat’s good, and much lighter than ice cream.  But the bingsu that will now forever come to my mind when I get an ice cream headache is from a place called Eskimo Hawaii.  Their “shaved ice” is made of milk that’s been hyper-frozen until it’s bone dry, and put through a shredder that makes it like sawdust.  So strange.  Then they top it with candied pumpkin, sweet rice cakes, and yes, red beans.  The milk flakes melt on your tongue and mix with the sweet toppings…it’s like milk and cookies all in one bite.

Some Stuff on a Stick

I love food on a stick.  Put anything on a stick, and it’s just better.  I think they should figure out a way to put spaghetti on a stick, I really do.  Korea agrees with me.  In every market and street food stall, there is no lack of stuff on a stick.

Meh.

Meh.

With all the pseudo-corndog teasing that I was subjected to, however, there was one cruel joke.  Long before coming to Korea, I had read about a mythical french fry-encrusted hot dog on a stick that was to be had in street food stalls Seoul.  Finding this unicorndog was on the top of my list of things to do while in Korea, understandably.  Accordingly, one day, I put on my walking shoes and set off to the big market in Namdaemun, vowing not to rest until I found it.  And find it I did.  And you know…it was just okay.  It needed salt, and it wasn’t as crispy as it either looks or should be.  Not at all worth a special trip.  Phooey.

Some Stuff I Ate and Was Surprised I Liked

fish intestinesWhen in Rome, as they say, do as the Romans do.  So, when in Korea, eat as the Koreans eat.  Some of that stuff can be pretty intimidating, though.  But, you know, if you just open your mind, and dispense with the preconceived notions, you just might slip one past your Western palate, and discover that you like fish eyeballs.  Yes, I ate fish eyeballs, and did not die.  They’re kind of like little savory raisins.  I won’t be getting into any slap fights to get my share of fish eyeballs anytime soon, but I can honestly say I didn’t hate it.  Also surprisingly good, the aforementioned sausages encased in fish paste on a stick.  It won’t be replacing the corndog in my heart, but they weren’t bad.  Fish intestine soup was pretty strange looking, but went down easy.

Those are not chicken breast tenders, they are fish egg sacks.

Those are not chicken breast tenders, they are fish egg sacks.

But the biggest surprise was pollack roe on rice for breakfast.  Had anyone told me a few months ago that I’d be happily nibbling on fish eggs and seaweed soup for breakfast, I’d have had them drug tested.  But, it’s true.  They marinate the egg sacks, and the roe takes on a smoky, very non-fishy flavor that, on rice, is about as close as Koreans get to lox and bagels.  I know you don’t believe me, but it’s the truth.

Some Stuff I Refused To Eat

Penis fish in the Busan fish market.

Penis fish in the Busan fish market.

I am a pretty good sport when it comes to most things, especially food, but even I have to put my foot down sometimes.  One of the things I just couldn’t bring myself to put in my mouth, was the penis fish.

Penis fish on a plate.

Penis fish on a plate.

Some try to make it better by calling it by its alternative name, the spoon worm.  Not helping.  In Busan, this creature is served live, sliced and still squirming.  Sorry…couldn’t do it.

silk worms

Boiled silk worm pupae (beondegi).

When I was in Mexico City earlier this year, I ate crickets (chapulines) and ant larvae (escamoles), and I won’t say I liked them, but I got them down without having to leave the table or spit them out in a napkin.  They eat roasted crickets in Korea, too, but I felt like I’d done my cricket duty in Mexico, so I politely declined.

Looks like I'm not the only one who had that reaction.

Looks like I’m not the only one who had that reaction.

But, when confronted with the Korean beondegi–boiled silk worm pupae–I almost threw up a little in my mouth.  This dish is common, too; you see it all over at street stalls.  The sight of it is bad enough, but the smell…oh god, the smell.  Imagine you’ve gone off and forgotten a load of laundry in the washer for a week during the hottest week of summer.  So very gross.

Umm...no thanks.

Umm…no thanks.

I know tomatoes are technically fruits, but before visiting Korea, I hadn’t seen them actually prepared like fruits.  Except, once, the Korean deli near my office in Oakland put cherry tomatoes in their fruit salad.  But, now I understand why.  Koreans treat tomatoes like the fruit that they are, making sorbet and sugary desserts and smoothies out of  them.  It just didn’t do it for me, though.

chickenbutt

I don’t see any bandages over his gizzard….

Finally, there was dakdongjib.  Literally translated as “chicken shit house” in Korean, dakdongjib is part of the alimentary canal of a chicken, close to the exit.  There is some dispute about whether what is served is actually the anal sphincter, or rather, the gizzard.  I don’t know the answer to that, but the restaurant in Busan that serves it has this illustration as its logo, so you do the math.

Some Stuff I’m Glad I Got Off My Ass To Do

Woljeongsa Temple in Gangwon.

Woljeongsa Temple in Gangwon.

Anyone who has traveled in Asia knows what it is to get temple fatigue.  After a while, one temple starts to look like every other temple, and they all require you to hike up bloody steep hills to get to them, and then prohibit you from taking any pictures.  By the time I was in Busan, toward the end of my time in Korea, I not only had a bad case of temple fatigue, but my Achilles tendons were inflamed, and I was in no mood to hike up any more mountains to then climb up another dizzying staircase just to see another statue of the Goddess of Mercy and Compassion who, I’m sorry, if she was really the Goddess of Mercy and Compassion, she’d have met me at the bottom of the damned hill.

Yonggungsa

Haedong Yonggungsa

So, it is all the more remarkable that I was even open to taking the bus 40 minutes north of Busan to see Haedong Yonggungsa.  But, I’m so glad I did.  For one, it’s the only temple in Korea that isn’t on top of a mountain; it’s perched on a bluff above the ocean.  The story goes that some ancient Buddhist monk had a dream about a sea god, in which he was instructed to build this temple by the sea.

108 steps.

108 steps.

But, that didn’t spare me climbing stairs, oh no.  There are 108 steps from the gate down to the bridge across the rocks to the temple.  The number 108 is a sacred figure in several eastern religions, including Buddhism, which holds that there are 108 human feelings, and 108 “agonies,” the latter of which inspired these steps, I can testify.

yonggungsa2But the effort was worth it; Yonggungsa is an ethereal place that invokes anything but a somber mood in its visitors.  It’s joyful and bright and leaves you feeling clean and light, even if you are not a particularly spiritual person.

Traffic Safety Pagoda

Traffic Safety Pagoda

There’s even a special pagoda for “Prayers for Traffic Safety,” marked with a truck tire.  Very practical, I think.  And since I was planning to rent a car the following week in Jeju Island, I threw a few Won into the box, lit a stick of incense, and said a silent prayer, just in case.  There are other well-worn prayer spots, too, such as a granite Buddha statue whose belly you can rub to ensure that your baby will be a boy–that one was rubbed smooth and shiny–as well as heavily attended shrine where folks can pray for “Excellence in Academics.”  But, not by me, I’m done with all that, thank goodness.

Some Stuff I Was Too Lazy To Get Off My Ass To Do

"Come have a slumber party with me!"

“Come have a slumber party with me!”

Read any information on how to make your trip to Korea authentic and wonderful, and you’ll run across information on doing a “temple stay.”  I read this stuff, too, and thought seriously about checking it out.  Temple stay is where you check in to a Buddhist temple for a few days or weeks, live with the monks, meditate, eat with them, etc.  It sounded like the type of experience that might be interesting, if not fun.  monk signSo, I investigated it at a number of temples, such as Woljeongsa in Gangwon.  It’s affordable, and I know I could do the required work, and the meditation. I could even deal with the all-plant diet and the doing your own dishes and the scratchy clothes.  But, then I found out you have to get up at 3:30 a.m. every day, and I said “Oh, I’m out.”  If anyone hears of a swing-shift temple stay program, let me know.

Some Stuff I Bought

I just wish they had printed it the other way around, so it would look like he is looking up at me when I have the socks on.

I just wish they had printed it the other way around, so it would look like he is looking up at me when I have the socks on.

I don’t do a lot of shopping when I travel, especially on this trip, where I would have to lug anything I got around indefinitely, unless I shipped it home.  But, I have picked up a couple of fun things.  My favorite Korean soap opera heart throb is Song Seung-Heon.  He’s stars in at least seven of the K-Dramas that I’ve seen–some of which I watched simply because he’s featured–and I think he’s just so pretty.  So, when I saw these goofy socks with his face on them, that say “I Love You,” well, I just had to have them.  Turns out, they’ve been useful, as I packed too few socks, thinking I would be wearing sandals more than I have been.

I love you even if you are doing weird.

I miss you even if you are doing weird.  I really do.

The other useful thing I bought is this cute utensil set with a spoon and pair of chopsticks in a pink carrying case.  I got it so I could eat yogurt or noodles or such in my hotel room, so I wouldn’t have to go out to eat all the time.  The case says “Lovely Friend” above the little bear with his cap on backwards, and below, it says:

“Naughty Bear

I’m really missing you, even if you are doing weird.  You understand me and take care of me.  So I thank you.  I wonder what you are doing now.  I think you every moments.  Perhaps, I like you.  I am your valuable friend.”

Even if I hadn’t have been in need of a portable utensil set, I think I would have to have bought it just for that inscription.

Some Stuff I Learned

My Kimchi Baby

My Kimchi Baby

One thing I was determined to learn when I went to Korea was how to make kimchi.  And I did.  I learned to make a number of classic Korean dishes, in fact.  I took some one-on-one cooking classes at Food & Culture Korea, with the beautiful and talented Jae Jeong.  I told her I wanted to learn techniques more than recipes, so I could really understand how the food is prepared.  If you know the technique, you can cook without a recipe.

All prepared with my own two little hands.

All prepared with my own two little hands.

She gave me exactly what I asked for, and now, I am equipped to cook you all an authentic Korean meal when I get home.  My dumplings may be ugly little piglets, as I lack Jae’s dumpling folding skill, but they will taste good.  I didn’t get to try the kimchi we made, though, because it had to ferment for a few weeks before it was ready.  But, my little ball of kimchi fermented away in my friend Jung Eun’s kimchi fridge, and when it was done fizzing itself to readiness, she informed me that it was, in fact, edible.  I am so proud.

The Billboard

The Billboard

Before I left San Francisco, I was driving back into the City over the Bay Bridge one day, and I noticed a big billboard right off the 80, just past the Fremont Street exit, seemingly advertising a vacation destination called “Dokdo Island.”  It had a beautiful picture of a rocky, exotic seaside and a lovely Korean woman, and a caption that read “Visit Beautiful Island! Dokdo, Korea!”  I had never heard of it, but knew I was headed to Korea, so I filed it away in my mental notebook of things to look into when I got there.  Well, I didn’t get to visit Dokdo, it was too out of the way, but I did learn something about it.  dokdoDokdo is the center of a brewing new dispute between Korea and Japan.  Dokdo is out in the East Sea between Korea and Japan, and apparently, despite centuries of settlement by Korean people, Japan has recently taken the position that Dokdo belongs to Japan.  This has Korean wigs in a major twist.  They are, after all, a tad sensitive when it comes to having their land claimed by Japan.  to NYTSo, there is a rather urgent PR campaign going on to make sure the world knows very well that Dokdo belongs to Korea, not Japan, and that the sea in which it lies is not the “Sea of Japan” but the “East Sea.”  That’s what that billboard was all about–planting in the minds of anyone who drove past the name of the island, and it’s association with Korea…just in case.

There is more…so much more.  My memory is full of vivid colors, wonderful people, funny signs, idyllic towns and oh so many teeny tiny towels.  Maybe next time, I’ll get to the bottom of why all the towels are so very, very tiny.  Or, I’ll just bring my own towel.  Either way, I am pretty sure I will be coming back.


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Sex, Mermaids & Tangerines

Jeju1Jeju Island.  Semi-tropical, volcanic island off the southern coast of South Korea.  Favorite honeymoon and golf getaway venue for the better-heeled Korean, Chinese and Japanese set.  Also, the setting for the most infuriating Korean soap opera finale of all frickin’ time.  If you’re a K-drama fan, you know I’m talking about the last scene of the first season of IRIS.  Okay, hang on, let me catch the others up….

IRIS

IRIS

All you need to know, is that the couple in the following clip both just retired from active spy duty with a South Korean government intelligence agency so they could finally live a quiet life together.  For 20 episodes, they were star-crossed, kept apart by the lies and malevolent agendas of various Svengalis, as well as their own conflicting loyalties.  Every time they were about to get together, something would tear them apart.  They even each thought the other was dead for a while.  So, they’ve been through quite the wringer.  In Episode 20, the final chapter, the Baddie gets his comeuppance, the two lovers quit the spy biz for good, and run off to Jeju Island for some long overdue R&R&R (rest & relaxation & romance).  He casually proposes and asks her if they can have five kids; she jokes that she can’t take such a random proposal, with no ring, seriously.  So, later, he leaves her a note to meet him at the lighthouse, and he goes and gets a ring.  She knows what’s coming, so she happily goes and waits for him, wistfully reflecting on all they’ve been through.  Then, this:

What.  The.  Hell!  They killed him in the final scene?  After 20 episodes of spectacular betrayals, intrigues, and narrow evasions of death at every turn?  When, finally, all obstacles to their love had been cleared from their path?  With her, standing on the lighthouse platform, waiting for him to come propose to her properly, right there in his sight as he bleeds out?  Aww, man…Korean soap operas have a tendency to have less than the full Hollywood happy endings, but this was just uncalled for.  I was so mad, I watched Spanish telenovelas instead of K-dramas for two months afterward out of spite, as payback for that beaver tail slap to the face.

The infamous lighthouse

The infamous lighthouse

But, I got over it.  There are, after all, a host of other K-dramas with happier scenes filmed on Jeju Island—or Jeju-do, as it’s called in Korean.  In fact, the tourist maps have all the film locations noted on them, so fans can easily find them.  Naturally, I made a beeline to the infamous IRIS lighthouse.  I even parked my rental car in the spot where they filmed his car screeching to a halt after he’d been shot.  It gave me closure.  I can move on now.  I might even watch the second season.  Maybe.

Jeju MapBut, back to Jeju.  The southern tip of South Korea shatters into a spray of little islands, and Jeju is the largest, and one of the most distant, of them.  Still, it’s a snap to get to, with ferry service from Busan, as well as practically hourly flights from Busan, Seoul and other major Korean and Japanese cities.  I took the 45-minute flight from Busan, and the ticket only cost me about $40 USD on Jeju Air.

Jeju Dolharubang

Jeju Dolharubang

Jeju has a personality all its own, very distinct from the mainland.  The local saying goes that Jeju-do is a land of “Three Abundances: rocks, wind and women”–because of the rocky lava landscape and the Dolharubang (ancient stone statues sprinkled around the island), the windy climate and the fact that Jeju women are more plentiful and dominant in its society than men–and “Three Lacks: thieves, locked gates and beggars”—as the community values are such that there is no theft or begging, and thus, no need to lock the front gates.  I can vouch for the Three Lacks, but from what I saw, I think they need to revise the Three Abundances to read “women, tangerines and sex museums.”

embraceThe place is lousy with “museums” of all kinds, actually, due to an apparent special tax benefit for museum owners.  But, on an island of roughly 700 square miles, there are three fairly large scale museums devoted to sex.  In the town of Seogwipo (pronounced “soggy-po”), there is the somewhat clinical, yet still X-rated, Museum of Sex and Health, as well as the World Eros Museum, devoted to erotica.  But, the biggest, and best known, is Jeju Loveland in Jeju City.

leg archLoveland is an adults-only sculpture park, started in 2004 by art students from Hongik University in Seoul.  The 140 sculptures in the park are all sexually inspired; some are more graphic than others, and some are even interactive.  boobie mountainsWith a few exceptions, the tone is humorous and playful, and encourages visitors to lighten the heck up about sex.  From the gaggles of giggling grannies I saw gleefully frolicking amongst the interactive exhibits, I’d say that message was received, in spades.

She's dropping a red chili pepper into a giant clam.  Subtle, no?

She’s dropping a red chili pepper into a giant clam. Subtle, no?

fanny fountain

There’s a snack bar at the far end of the trail through the park.  It’s adjacent to a giant, mosaic-tiled posterior—complete with butterfly tattoo–peeing into a pond, next to which a comely maiden rides astride a rearing, phallic steed.  Because, you know…that kind of sight can make a person a bit peckish.  As I approached, an apron-clad auntie came out of the snack bar and insisted I try a sample of some fragrant, fresh baked goods she had in a basket.

Bag o' Dicks

Bag o’ Dicks

They were little cream-filled waffles shaped like boobies and wee-wees.  Of course.  What else?  Although, I personally felt the joke would have been carried home a little better by some kind of Bavarian cream filling, these were filled, like almost all pastries in Korea, with sweet red bean paste.  Anyway, I always feel obligated to buy after I accept a sample, and they weren’t bad, so I went inside to buy one.  But, they only came in bags of three.  So, I bought and, yes, ate…a bag of dicks.  And, I thought about Louis C.K. the whole time.

I may have to tweet him about this.

jeju1More ubiquitous than, and some would argue equally salubrious as, the sex museums, though, are tangerine orchards.  For centuries, Jeju has been famous for–indeed, practically synonymous with–tangerines.  The island is, literally, covered with tangerine trees.  jeju3The climate and volcanic soil on the eastern side of the island, near Seogwipo, are perfect for citrus cultivation.  In the IRIS video above, notice that, when the girl is sitting by the window reading, she’s got a big basket of tangerines next to her, and there’s a giant pile of peels on the floor.  Oh yeah, you don’t go to Jeju and not gorge yourself on tangerines.  It just isn’t done.

Historical records indicate tangerines were offered as tribute to the king as early as 476 A.D., in the Baekje Dynasty.  They were prized not only for their sweet taste, but also for their value in oriental medicine.

Smell-evision at the Jeju Citrus Museum.  Push the button, and the fragrance of different citrus blossoms wafts out.

Smell-evision at the Jeju Citrus Museum. Push the button, and the fragrance of different citrus blossoms wafts out.

Once the royals got a taste of Jeju’s tangerines, they couldn’t get enough, and demanded a huge tribute of tangerines each year, to the point that the local governors requisitioned the fruit on all the trees on the island, including those in people’s back yard gardens.  Here’s a groovy 3D video they had at the Tangerine Museum (yes, they had a tangerine museum, complete with “Smell-evision”) of a dramatic reenactment of the ancient King first learning about the wondrous tangerine:

Got that?  Good.  So, civil servants would run around the island during the bloom, and count the buds on the trees, and then show up to collect exactly that number of fruit at harvest time.  If your tangerines failed to develop, fell, or got eaten by bugs or birds before they could be collected, you had to pay a fine for the missing ones.  If your tangerines were of inferior quality, you could be charged with mismanagement of tangerines, stripped of your property, and converted to a person of the slave class.  Harsh, no?  So, during that time, people who didn’t want to take the risk, would pour boiling water on tangerine saplings, to kill the tree before they could be held responsible for it.  But, on the flip side, if a slave managed to plant some tangerine trees and yield some good fruit, he could be elevated out of slave class to a citizen.  Later, when the tangerine industry started to be a profit center for Jeju residents, they called tangerine trees “college trees,” because if you planted enough, you’d be able to afford to send your kids to college.

Tangerine Tree Root Chandelier, as tangerine trees are the root of Jeju's economy

Tangerine Tree Root Chandelier, symbolizing tangerine trees as the root of Jeju’s economy

There are several varieties of tangerines grown on Jeju, and citrus stands dot the roads all around the island.  I couldn’t wait to get my hands on some.  Tangerines have been my favorite fruit since I was little, when we had tangerine and tangelo trees in our groves in Southern California.  I have many fond memories of sitting under the trees in the sunshine, sweet tangerine juice running down my chin, my hands and arms all sticky, as the honey bees buzzed whimsically around.

fruit standSo, first thing, even before I went to Loveland, I stopped at a roadside stand to buy some tangerines.  The farmer sent his helper running up to the house to fetch his daughter from her homework to come help, as she could speak a few words of English.  I’ll spare you the play by play, but suffice it to say we had a minor disagreement about which, and how many, tangerines I would be taking home with me.  tangerinesI wanted the plumper, dark orange ones with thick, dimpled skin, and he seemed to want to unload these sad little greenish, golf ball-sized, shiny, thin-skinned ones that didn’t look appetizing to me.  And, he insisted I had to take at least a kilo, which is a lot of tangerines.  Finally, by the time his poor daughter had smoke coming out her ears from trying to translate the exchange, I agreed to take a kilo, and he agreed to split it half-and-half between the two varieties.

The sour ones

The sour ones

And darn it, he was right.  The ugly little green splotchy ones were sweet, juicy, brilliant ruby and delicious inside, whereas the big fat orange ones that had attracted me were sour and dry, like the Naranja Agria you get in the Latin markets back home for cooking rather than eating.

The good ones

The good ones

Shows you what I know.  I had to go back later and apologize to the farmer, and get some more of those yummy little ones, after I hoovered through what he had given me in one day.  To his credit, he didn’t gloat.  To my face, anyway.

One of Korea’s uniquely charming traits is how it can embrace modern progress, charging headlong into the high tech future, while at the same time, its historical and folk culture remains intact.  This is evident nowhere plainer than on Jeju-do.

Seongup

Seongup

jeju1I’m not talking about self-consciously quaint reproductions of old-timey traditional burgs filled with souvenir shops, although there are some of those.  No, Jeju’s got the real thing.  There are entire villages of inhabited thatch-roofed, mud and stone hut compounds surrounded by low walls of stacked lava rocks to keep the pigs and chickens from taking off.  Seongup is one such village.

Air-conditioned mud hut

Air-conditioned mud hut

People still live and work in these anachronistic communities, and not just to provide atmosphere for the tourists.  It has been their way of life for generations.  They do add modern conveniences here and there, though.

Because livestock is kept inside the walls of the homesteads, they put stone pillar gates–called “jeongnang”–at the entrance, and block the gate with one to three wooden poles to keep the animals in when they aren’t around to mind them.

Jeongnang

Jeongnang

They also use the jeongnang poles as a message system to communicate with the neighbors, as well as any camera-wielding tourists who may wander in.  If all three poles are up in the gate, it means “Don’t come in.”  Two poles up means the owner is out for a while, but will be back in a bit.  One pole up means the owner is not in the house, but is somewhere close by.  All three poles down means the owner is home, and visitors are welcome.  Remember, no locked gates on Jeju-do.

haenyeo4The most defining cultural feature of Jeju-do, though, is the Haenyeo.  The “sea women.”  Specifically, women free divers.  If you drive along the coast, chances are you will catch a glimpse of a group of black rubber-suited figures popping their heads up from the surface of the dark, clear sea, whistling like trains in the distance as they exhale their long-held breath.  These are the haenyeo.  Jeju’s mermaids.  They work in tight sisterhoods, diving for as long as two minutes at a time without the assistance of air tanks, to hand-gather abalone, oysters, mussels, octopi, urchins, and any other edible, useful or saleable sea creature or plant they can find.  They even dive when they’re pregnant, and well into old age.  Some of these broads are in their 70s, and they’re still hauling their entire extended family’s livelihood out of the sea with their bare hands, every day.

These haenyeo statues are dotted all along the coast.

These haenyeo statues are dotted all along the coast.

haenyeo1As early as the 17th century, women were the breadwinners in Jeju, diving for marine products from the sea in the morning, and tending family farms in the afternoon.  This came about in part, because so many of the island’s men blew away when out to sea to fish (remember, wind is one of the Three Abundances), but also for a much more practical reason.  Under the early laws, women weren’t taxed.  So, Jeju’s women took to the seas, and the yield from their day’s work was more profitable, because they weren’t taxed.  Soon, they figured out that women were more suited to diving; they didn’t get cold so fast, because of higher body fat.  As a result, gender roles on Jeju reversed, with women assuming the place as heads of the household.

A Haenyeo Village

A Haenyeo Village

They created a sure-fire matriarchal society on Jeju-do.  Confucian traditionalists on the mainland didn’t like that; women were supposed to be inferior and submissive.  So, they tried to ban women from diving.  But, the Jeju haenyeo ignored them, and went about their business.  So central were the haenyeo to the economic health of the island, there is a saying on Jeju when someone has a baby:  “if it’s a girl, we’ll roast a pig and have a party; if it’s a boy, we’ll kick him in the hip.”  Not that the haenyeo didn’t have any use for men in their circles.  You know…as pets, to keep warm at night.

Look how tired she looks.

Look how tired she looks.

The haenyeo were also critical to the anti-Japanese resistance in Korea.  They continually staged protests and fought against the Japanese occupation in Jeju in the 19th century.  In the 1930s, Japan had turned Jeju-do into a military base.  The haenyeo organized two years of full-scale rebellion against Japanese oppression of Jeju’s fishing and marine industries, rallying thousands of villagers to stand up for their rights.  It is considered one of the three most significant anti-Japanese movements in Korea’s history, and the only one lead by women.

Casting of a hanyeo's face

Casting of a hanyeo’s face

At the height of Jeju’s marine product export economy in the 1950s, there were as many as 30,000 haenyeo on Jeju.  They made good money, and sent their daughters to college instead of having them follow in their flippers to a life in the sea.  As a result, by 1970, the number of working haenyeo was down to 16,000.  Today, there are fewer than 6,000 haenyeo still plying the waters around Jeju-do.  Two-thirds of them are over 60 years old, and over a thousand of them are over 70.  But, they remain the pride of Jeju.  So concerned is the community that the haenyeo are dying out, they have established a school, where anyone who wants to learn the haenyeo trade is welcome to enroll.

If it wasn’t for Dale, and my extra-buoyant figure, I’d give it a whirl.  But, I’d probably end up like this crusty old bat (note the tangerines):


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Anyone For Some Cuttlefish Jerky?

When you are enjoying a nice, frosty brew with your friends after a long day, or while watching the game, don’t you just want to gnaw on some desiccated mollusk flesh dipped in mayonnaise?  You do if you’re in Korea!

squids

Freshly Caught

In the States, the only consumers of cuttlefish may be parakeets (you know, the cuttlebone you’re supposed to put in their cages for them to nibble and rub their beaks on), but all over East Asia, cuttlefish is a very popular snack food for humans.

Cuttlefish, drying on the line

Cuttlefish, drying on the line

Despite the name, cuttlefish are actually mollusks, in the same class of marine Cephalopoda as squid and octopi.

The most popular way to eat it in Korea is dried, like jerky, often together with peanuts.  It’s especially popular as an accompaniment to drinking beer or soju.

At the movies

At the movies (with peanuts)

cuttle with peanuts

Snack pack with peanuts

You see it everywhere:  at street vendors’ carts, in convenience stores next to the chips, even at the concession stand at the movies.

The seasides are dotted with drying racks draped with the corpses of cuttlefish, and the markets are cluttered with stalls of vendors selling stacks of the flat, pressed product.

Vendor drying cuttlefish on the roof of his shop

Vendor drying cuttlefish on the roof of his shop

Cuttlefish in the market

Cuttlefish in the market

The way you eat it–at least, the way I was shown–is, if you can, you toast the dried cuttlefish over a flame and char it a little bit.  Not very much, just enough to singe it slightly and give it a smoky note.  (If you don’t have access to a flame to toast it, just skip this step.)

Flame-toasted cuttlefish with mayo and chili sauce

Flame-toasted cuttlefish with mayo and chili sauce

Then, you tear off thin shreds of the meat, like little ribbons, and dip it in mayonnaise first, then a chili sauce, and pop it in your mouth!  Mmmmm-mmm!

Tentacle Jerky

Fish and Tentacle Jerky Selection

Cuttlefish isn’t the only marine animal that people like to eat dried in this fashion.  For example, dried octopus tentacles are also to be had in the markets, as are all manner of dried, pressed fish.  But, cuttlefish is, by far, the most popular to munch on while you’re getting your buzz on with some good beer or soju.

Those of us with Western palates will probably jump to a conclusion about why it’s popular to eat while drinking; our tastebuds can have beer-goggles, too, after all!  But, I was sober as a judge when I had it, and I enjoyed it.  I thought it was savory and delicious, if a bit…cuttlefishy.  But, then again, dip anything in enough mayonnaise and chili sauce and I’ll eat it and think it’s good.


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Equal Time For Dog Lovers…Sort Of

"Godabang" is a cat café chain

“Godabang” is a cat café chain

A couple weeks ago, I posted about a wonderful kitty café that I happened upon in Gyeongju, South Korea, where you can enjoy the fuzzy affections of a bevy of feline gigolos with your coffee.  I have found a few more since then; they are apparently very popular with city dwellers who can’t have pets in their homes.  There are even cat café chains, with locations all over.  But, not everyone loves the kittenzes as much as I do.  What about them?  Well, fear not, there are puppy cafés, too.

I found one in the Jangsan neighborhood of Haeundae Beach, in Busan.  I want to call it a Puppy Pub, or a Dawg Dive, but the establishment–on the second floor, over a pet store–only served foo-foo coffees and teas.  I don’t know why, but it seems to me that a venue catering to dog people should have a liquor license.  Beer and wine, at least.  Maybe it’s just me.  Anyway, no booze at this Canine Café.

The Canine Café. See the glass partition?

The Canine Café.
See the glass partition?

Right off the bat, I noticed a fundamental difference between this outfit and the cat cafés: the dogs are in a pen, separate from the café area.  It’s right next to it, but it’s divided by a low, transparent wall so the hounds can’t get to the people at the tables.  The front foyer gate opens into the puppy playpen, and that is where the coffee counter is, but the seating area is behind glass.  I didn’t like that.  I wanted to drink my coffee while I played with the pups.  But, then I learned why.  They pee.  They pee often.  They pee a lot.  Oh, so much pee….

cockerThere was an attendant who ran around behind them and cleaned it up as close to immediately as one could expect, so it didn’t really smell in there, but still, not appropriate for a food service area.  Cats prefer to retire to the privacy of a litter box to tinkle, so the cat café people can just put a little cat flap in the door to the litter box room, and trust the pusses to honor the system.  Dogs, not so much.  Not a bashful bladder in the group.  So, okay, I get it. They have to separate the room.

"I don't see you"

“I don’t see you”

The eight or nine pooches in the play area were all immaculately groomed, healthy-looking, and pretty well-behaved, but for the recidivist peeing (which, I guess, we can’t really blame on them.  It’s not like there was a dog door to a back yard where they could go outside).  But, there was something odd about them.  It took me a while to figure it out.  Then, it hit me.  They were ignoring me.

"Got any food?  No?  Okay, bye."

“Got any food? No? Okay, bye.”

Basically, except for one little cocoa-colored poodle who managed to feign interest in me for the minute or so it took to ascertain whether I had any food to give him, none of these dogs paid any attention to me at all.

"Is someone better coming?"

“Is someone better coming?”

They pretty much sat with their backs to me, or stood at the gate, waiting for someone better to come along (translation: someone with food).  I know what you’re thinking:  just give them some treats, and they’re yours.  Well, I thought of that, but the place specifically forbids feeding the dogs.  I can see why they wouldn’t allow people to bring their own food to give them; they couldn’t control the safety of what the dogs eat that way.  But, if they’re going to have such stuck up pups, they really should make some kind of treats/bribes available for purchase.  Baby carrots, or something healthy, so they don’t founder.  I dunno.  Something.

saint bernieIt was the darndest thing.  I can’t remember the last time I was around a dog that didn’t make a total nuisance of itself, jumping on me, licking my hands, staring intently at me while I’m reading or watching tv, or trying to stick its snout in my crotch.  They normally exhibit an extravagant enthusiasm level at my arrival that one just can’t expect from a cat.  I was at a total loss.  (Maybe they heard what I said about them being the easy girls of the animal high school….Which one of you blabbed?)

I sat there, trying in vain to entice a gorgeous, snow white Akita to come to me, my lame tongue clicking noises impotent against her indifference.  I recalled the cat café, and how surprised I had been at how attentive and affectionate all the kitties were with me at first glance.  Obsequious, almost.  Where the heck had I landed that cats are the attention-seeking trollops, and dogs are haughty and aloof?  I have really fallen down the rabbit hole!  Ooh…rabbits.  Now, there’s a great idea for a café!  A bunny bar!  Who’s in?


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Gettin’ Jjigae Wit It

Food, glorious food!  Oh, gentle friends, you know it is my raison d’être.  I think I’m going to have to tell you about the food I’ve been discovering in Korea in installments, because there’s just too much to talk about in one post.  Today’s Episode:  Soup.

Gamjatang, or Pork Spine Soup with Potatoes

“Gamjatang,” or
Pork Spine Soup with Potatoes

Koreans take their soup seriously.  Just as nary a meal is complete in the Land of the Morning Calm without kimchi, I’m finding that most meals–even breakfast–involve some kind of soup, whether as the main attraction, or as an accompaniment.  There are multiple words for soup in Korean:  guk, tang, jjigae and jeongol, and those are just the terms that I’ve encountered.  There are, doubtless, more.  Some may quibble that jjigae and jeongol are really “stews,” not “soups”–I’ve even heard them erroneously referred to as “casseroles”–but I’ve eaten enough of all of them now to feel that I’m on taxonomically solid ground putting them all under the general “soup” umbrella.  You wanna call them stews, get on with your bad self, I’m not going to argue.

"Kalguksu"

“Kalguksu,” or hand-cut noodle soup in clear broth (this one also had dumplings)

I have noticed that “guk” and “tang” each seem to refer to soups with clear (or clear-ish) broth, whereas jjigae often seems to involve red, murky broths spiced with the delicious, fermented chili paste, gochujang.  I could be wrong.  That’s just my observation.  But, otherwise, I honestly find it pretty hard to differentiate between the various sorts of soupy wonders that are called guk, tang, jjigae and jeongol, respectively.

Cooking Up Romance

Cooking Up Romance

One of the first Korean soap operas that I ever watched was called “Cooking Up Romance,” and was set in a traditional Korean beef soup restaurant.  (A soup opera!)  I used to laugh at these scenes where the owner of the shop would yell at his staff and cry about how they would commit the tiniest transgressions, deviating from his original beef soup recipe and bringing shame to his establishment and name, and how the grandma would scream at the owner’s college student daughter about her lack of filial piety in not wanting to take over the restaurant and serve the family’s beef soup to generations to come.  Seriously, the beef soup was, itself, a character in this show.

Vats of "Gukbap" (pork soup with rice) in front of a family restaurant in Busan

Vats of “Gukbap” (pork soup with rice) in front of a family restaurant in Busan

They were not joking around, either, these were not comedic scenes.  Luckily, the hapless young chef-Man Bong-came along, mastered the owner’s recipe, and fell in love with the owner’s prodigal daughter, keeping the restaurant, and tradition, alive and in the family.  So, now that I’m in Korea, and I see so many soup restaurants touting a multi-generational traditional family recipe, I can’t help but remember that charming and hilarious show.

Sundubu Jjigae

This “Sundubu Jjigae”–spicy, soft tofu jjigae–brought me back from the dead after my night at the Room Salon. Amazing hangover remedy!

If you go to a Korean barbecue restaurant, where you grill the meat on the table, you’ll also get a big, bubbling pot of some kind of jjigae, along with ten or twenty different “banchan”–the ubiquitous side dishes that are served in every Korean restaurant.  The fattier and heavier the meat you are cooking, the spicier the jjigae will be, to cut the grease.  WILLSMITHBut, make no mistake, like it or not, you will be gettin’ jjigae wit it.  (Oh, forgive me, I have been waiting to use that line for weeks!  No one here gets the reference, they just look at me like “yeah, you always get jjigae, what’s so funny?”  Thanks, it’s out of my system now, I promise.)

Not Seaweed Soup.  Gukbap.

Not Seaweed Soup. Gukbap.

On their birthdays, Koreans traditionally eat seaweed soup.  This is, apparently, because that’s what is fed to new mothers after giving birth, to restore their strength.  So, eating it on your birthday is a sort of commemoration of your mother’s birthing experience.  Sounds fair to me.  She suffered, why shouldn’t you?  (Just teasing, the seaweed soup I’ve had–usually for breakfast, with rice–has been pretty tasty.)

See, I would spit those things out.

See, I would spit those things out.  Shows you what I know.

I have been lucky enough to join Korean friends in the soup restaurants, so that I could observe and imitate their strategy in attacking the repast.  It isn’t always obvious.  What condiments you add, what you pick out with chopsticks vs. what you slurp up with the spoon, what you spit out, what you gnaw on, what you soak up with rice, etc.  It’s a veritable faux pas waiting to happen.  blue crap(I’m still emotionally scarred from the whole “Soft-Boiled Egg in a Cup Incident of 1984” in Germany, where the whole table was politely waiting for me to begin eating, and I had no idea what to do with the damned thing; I’d never been served an egg still in the shell before.  Let’s just say, there was spoon violence, yolk explosion, shirts ruined….I swear, my poor German host family must have thought they’d taken in a teenaged barbarian.)  After a while, though, I realized that as long as you eat with gusto, and enjoy the food (which isn’t difficult), Korean cooks will be happy with you, and how you get it down your gullet is of lesser importance.  The other diners might make fun of you, but you probably won’t understand them anyway, so don’t worry about it.

Buddae Jjigae

Buddae Jjigae

I’ve seen it argued that the difference between “jjigae” and “jeongol” is the number of star ingredients, with jjigae having usually just one featured component, like kimchi or tofu, and jeongol having multiple, like “haemul jeongol,” which has several different kinds of seafood.  In response to this theory, I invoke the immortal Colonel Sherman T. Potter of the TV show M.A.S.H., and say:  Horse Hockey!  Were that the case, how would you explain Buddae Jjigae?  Ahhh…Buddae Jjigae.  The fact that this is, hands down, my favorite Korean soup so far is just proof positive that, whereas some folks’ bodies are temples, mine is a landfill.  It’s okay, I own it.

buddae jjigae cook 2

Sliced American cheese melting into the soup. You won’t know it’s there when the Buddae Jjigae is done, but you’d know if it was missing.

Buddae jjigae came about due to scarcity of food during and after the Korean War, when impoverished Koreans had to make do with scraps scavenged from the American military.  Originally made from leftover Army rations–hot dogs, Spam, canned beans, and whatever else they could find–it’s also called Army Base Stew, or “Johnson Tang,” referencing the common American surname.  It’s still very popular today.  Some people are very sentimental about it.  Everyone has their own recipe, but the classic has to contain hot dogs, ham, Spam or a Spam-like processed meat, ground beef, canned baked beans, instant ramen noodles, kimchi, onions, and a couple slices of American cheese that dissolve completely into the spicy, red broth, yielding a mysterious, rich, velvety quality that you just couldn’t achieve any other way.  It.  Is.  So.  Good.  If I had to compare the taste to something, I’d say it kind of reminds me of when I was a kid, when we went camping, my mom would cut up hot dogs into Campbell’s Bean and Bacon soup.  But much spicier, and with more stuff thrown in.

Buddae Jjigae Kit

Buddae Jjigae Kit

There are restaurants all over that specialize in Buddae Jjigae.  But, you can also get these kits delivered right to your house, containing all the ingredients, already chopped and prepped and ready to be thrown into the pot.

They should call it "Shame Soup"

They should call it “Shame Soup”

You just call on the phone and say how many you want, and shortly, a guy on a motorbike shows up at your door with your Buddae Jjigae kits, and 20 minutes later…it’s soup!  Genius, no?  Why don’t we have that kind of a service in the States?  Someone, get on that before I get home.


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Pussy Galore

[Don’t worry, guys, I’m not writing about girl parts again.  You can safely read on.]

IMG_5452I was walking down a dubious looking street in Gyeongju today, when I happened upon this sign.  I still can’t read Korean–it all looks like spiders on ice skates and Spaghetti O’s to me–but those kitty cartoons and the prices caught my attention.  A lot of the restaurants here use signs like this to promote their menu items, with cutesy cartoons of the animals whose meat they serve, instead of pictures of the dishes.  And I know there are some places in Korea that serve a dog meat stew, so, my heart verily stopped at the possibility that this sign was for a restaurant serving kitty cat fricassee.

IMG_5419Out of morbid curiosity, I peeked through the doorway to see if I could get confirmation one way or the other, and I saw this pink plaque on the stairway for “Cat Cafe Cat Town” on the second floor.  Hmm…the name doesn’t reveal enough.  The beef restaurant across the street was called “Beef House Korean Beef Restaurant,” so this could totally still be a cat restaurant.  Just to make sure, I went up the stairs, and opened the door to find….

Cat Café!

Cat Café!

P1040348An actual cat café!  As in, a café where you have your coffee with a bunch of cats.  Kitties everywhere!  Hundreds of them!  Well, okay, not hundreds, but at least 30.

P1040326Abyssinians, Bengals, Persians, Siamese, Russian Blues, they had them all.  Fat kitties, svelte kitties, boy kitties, girl kitties, longhaired kitties, short haired kitties, kitties, kitties, kitties of every kind!

Hello Kitty!

These were some of the sweetest, most affectionate kitties I’ve ever encountered, too.  I am a cat person, so I know the value of kitty love.  Cats don’t hand it out indiscriminately, like dogs do.  Dogs are very emotionally slutty, but cats–especially well-fed cats, like these–don’t generally bestow their purry gifts on just anyone.  [Now, don’t be sending me hate mail, dog people.  I love dogs, too.  I just calls it like I sees it, and you know I’m right–dogs are the easy girls of the animal high school.  Nothing wrong with that.]

P1040345P1040338But these babies were so friendly and curious, they just hopped up next to me and started going through my purse as soon as I came in and sat down.  Everyone had to have a sniff through my bag, and then sit in it for a while.

IMG_5447

Getting some good kitty love

Getting some good kitty love

This little Abyssinian guy was so pushy, he crawled up my arm, burrowed through my hair, and settled in on my shoulder to purr in my ear.  Oh, that is my favorite sound in the whole world!  That is the sound of contentment, right there.  I was in heaven.

P1040318This sweet little Russian Blue kitty threw himself into my arms and snuggled in with his belly up to be rubbed.  There was a Himalayan girl kitty on my lap, and the Abyssinian on my shoulder…I was in the middle of a kitty cat three-way love fest, and I couldn’t have been happier.

P1040319

“You fool,” she seems to be saying.

That’s when it hit me.  They were hustling me, those kitties were.  I was in a kitty cat hostess bar!  A feline “room salon,” as it were.  It was their job to act all cute, and purr and rub on me, and tease me with the promise of their rare kitty love, just to get me to stay longer and order more coffee at 7,000 Won a pop (that’s roughly $7 USD).  Those wiley minxes.  Well…I’ll still take it.  I do have my needs, after all.